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Russian contributions
Russians have made numerous contributions to Canadian life.
The early Russian immigrants helped to ensure the physical development of this country.

Later waves of immigration brought the most educated, politically conscious, and culturally active.
From their ranks have come scholars, musicians, and artists including muralist Bill Perehudoff, the son of a Doukhobor farmer in Saskatchewan; portrait and still-life artist Parashkeva Clark; and Nicholas de Grandmaison, a portraitist specializing in First Nations subjects.
Russians have made numerous contributions to Canadian life.
The early Russian immigrants helped to ensure the physical development of this country.

Later waves of immigration brought the most educated, politically conscious, and culturally active.
From their ranks have come scholars, musicians, and artists including muralist Bill Perehudoff, the son of a Doukhobor farmer in Saskatchewan; portrait and still-life artist Parashkeva Clark; and Nicholas de Grandmaison, a portraitist specializing in First Nations subjects.

During the 1930s, Boris Volkoff trained dancers and aroused interest in ballet.
In 1955, Ludmilla Chiriaeff, born in Latvia of Russian parents, founded Les grands ballets Canadiens in Montreal.
It is therefore only fitting that ballet star Mikhail Baryshnikov chose to defect while on tour in Canada in 1974.

Finally, the five sons of Count Paul Ignatieff have made an extraordinary number of contributions in the academic arena and diplomatic corps.
The Count's youngest son, George, served as Canadian Ambassador to Yugoslavia, Deputy High Commissioner in London, and as the permanent representative of Canada to the North Atlantic Council of NATO in Paris and the United Nations.
A theatre at the University of Toronto was named after Ignatieff, who also served as Chancellor of the University of Toronto.
It follows that his son, Michael, has gone on to distinguish himself as a writer, historian, and broadcaster both in Canada and abroad.

Music, Mathematics, Psychology, and Peace are among the academic expertise of Professor Emeritus Anatol Rapoport, University of Toronto, who, at 88, still teaches a course in the Psychology Department on his long-standing interest in "game theory." Born, Lozovaya, Russia, 1911, Professor Rapoport earned diplomas in piano, composition and conducting at Vienna Hochschule fur aMusik, 1934, before moving to the U.S.A. to obtain his S.M., 1940, and Ph.D., Mathematics, 1941, University of Chicago.

Captain, U.S. Air Force during World War II, between 1947 and 1954, Professor Rapoport taught Mathamatics, University of Chicago, was Fellow, Stanford University Center Advanced Study Behavioral Sciences, 1954-55, before becoming Professor of Mathematics and Senior in Research Mathematics, Mental Health Research Institute, University of Michigan, 1955-70.

Professor of Mathematics and Psychology, University of Toronto, 1970-80, and, since 1984, Professor of Peace Studies, same institution, his long interest in Peace studies led to his election as President, Canadian Peace Research & Education Association, 1972-1975, and President, Science for Peace, 1984-86. Dr. Rapoport has been a visiting or guest professor throughout his professional career at such institutions as University of Warsaw; Vienna Institute for Advanced Studies; Technical University of Denmark; Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin; University of Hiroshima, and Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich.

He is the author of more than 300 articles.

In 1976 he received the Lenz International Peace Research Prize and holds honorary degrees from the Universities of Western Michigan, Toronto, Royal Military College, and the University of Bern, Switzerland.
 
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