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The Beginning of Russian settlement in Canada
Russian settlement in Canada began as early as the nineteenth century when Doukhobors, members of a Russian Christian sect similar to the Society of Friends, assisted by British and American Quakers and novelist Leo Tolstoy, migrated to Canada in the late 1890s after persecution for refusing military service.
Russian settlement in Canada began as early as the nineteenth century when Doukhobors, members of a Russian Christian sect similar to the Society of Friends, assisted by British and American Quakers and novelist Leo Tolstoy, migrated to Canada in the late 1890s after persecution for refusing military service.

The group settled in the Prince Albert and Yorkton areas of Saskatchewan.
By 1908, a group of Doukhobors had moved west to British Columbia and established residence there in the Kootenay and Grand Forks areas.
Ambassador, author, diplomatic advisor, and University Chancellor, George Ignatieff, born St. Petersburg, Russia, 1913, became, after immigrating to Canada and attending schools in both Montreal and Toronto, a distinguished statesman who joined Canada's Department of External Affairs, 1940, shortly after attending Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar.

Son of Count Paul Ignatieff, last Minister of Education under Tsar Nicholas II, as a young man, George developed an expertise in East-West relations, particularly at the United Nations where his service included terms as Canadian Ambassador and President of the Security Council.

He was also Ambassador to Yugoslavia, 1956-58, and Permanent Representative of Canada to NATO, North Atlantic Council, Paris, 1962-66.

A distinguished statesman, George Ignatieff received honorary degrees from Brock University, University of Toronto, University of Guelph, University of Saskatchewan, York University, Bishop's, and Victoria University. Provost, Trinity College, University of Toronto, 1972-79, Dr. Ignatieff was appointed Chancellor, University of Toronto, 1980-86. Named Companion, Order of Canada, 1973, before he died, 1988, Dr. Ignatieff wrote his memoirs, The Making of Peacemongers, 1985.
 
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